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RE (2):

https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2KeVJbU&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AFQjCNH6SKqayO0QPeuaK6WVfbTkQA3C5w

Fwd

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Posted by on 30/06/2018 in Uncategorized

 

Re (5):

Surprise!

 
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Posted by on 22/05/2018 in Uncategorized

 

Re (4):

View message…

 
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Posted by on 17/04/2018 in Uncategorized

 

b7

Hey there

http://ef2m-marseille.com/mrqzcn.php?4ed8h.txt

Sent from my iPad
Begin forwarded message:

Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom.

From: Cgrant555 -cgrant555-
Date: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 05:51:10 -0700
To: Nguyen Ngoc Bach
Subject: Re: b7

http://ef2m-marseille.com/mrqzcn.php?4ed8h.txt

 
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Posted by on 13/06/2017 in Uncategorized

 

Re (3): Greats

http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fnatasawak.cloudsonline.net%2Fhotfwhlv.php%3Fajdf42romtl&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AFQjCNGZ90FSIZ-1Crs3bvXT1JSEwAEV3w

Sent from my iPad
Begin forwarded message:

Compromise makes a good umbrella, but a poor

From: Cgrant555 -cgrant555-
Date: Sun, 4 Jul 2016 05:53:00 +0000
To: Nguyen Ngoc Bach
Subject: Re (3): Greats

Mail Code: q0ce

 
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Posted by on 04/07/2016 in Uncategorized

 

Time is Running Short to Claim Your 2009 Refund

If you haven’t filed your 2009 federal tax return, you may still have time to claim your tax refund. The IRS has $917 million in unclaimed refunds from an estimated 984,000 tax returns that people didn’t file for the 2009 tax year. The IRS estimates that half the potential refunds for 2009 are more than $500.

Here are some things the IRS wants you to know about unclaimed refunds:

1. Not required to file. You may not have filed a 2009 tax return because you didn’t earn enough income to have a filing requirement. If you had taxes withheld from your wages or made quarterly estimated payments, you can still file a return and claim your refund.

2. Three-year window. You have three years to claim a refund. If you don’t claim your refund within three years, the money becomes property of the U.S. Treasury. For 2009 returns, the window closes on April 15, 2013. You must properly address, postmark and mail your return by that date. There is no penalty for filing a late return if you are due a refund.

3. Don’t miss the EITC. By not filing a return, you may miss an important credit — the Earned Income Tax Credit. For 2009, the credit is worth as much as $5,657. The EITC can put extra money in the pockets of individuals and families with low and moderate incomes. If you are eligible for the EITC, you must file a federal income tax return to claim the credit. This is true even if you are not otherwise required to file.

4. Some refunds applied. The IRS may hold your refund if you have not filed tax returns for 2010 and 2011. The law allows the use of your federal tax refund to pay any amounts still owed to the IRS or your state tax agency. If you have unpaid debts, such as overdue child support or student loans, your refund may be applied to pay that debt.

Current and prior year tax forms and instructions are available at IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676). If you are missing Forms W-2, 1098, 1099 or 5498, you should request copies from your employer, bank or other payer. If you can’t get these forms, you can get a free transcript from the IRS showing the information you need from those forms.

Order a transcript by filing Form 4506-T, Request for Transcript of Tax Return, with the IRS, or by calling 800-829-1040.

QB-Xpert

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Five Tax Credits that Can Reduce Your Taxes

A tax credit reduces the amount of tax you must pay. A refundable tax credit not only reduces the federal tax you owe, but also could result in a refund.

Here are five credits the IRS wants you to consider before filing your 2012 federal income tax return:

1. The Earned Income Tax Credit is a refundable credit for people who work and don’t earn a lot of money. The maximum credit for 2012 returns is $5,891 for workers with three or more children. Eligibility is determined based on earnings, filing status and eligible children. Workers without children may be eligible for a smaller credit. If you worked and earned less than $50,270, use the EITC Assistant tool on IRS.gov to see if you qualify. For more information, see Publication 596, Earned Income Credit.

2. The Child and Dependent Care Credit is for expenses you paid for the care of your qualifying children under age 13, or for a disabled spouse or dependent. The care must enable you to work or look for work. For more information, see Publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses.

3. The Child Tax Credit may apply to you if you have a qualifying child under age 17. The credit may help reduce your federal income tax by up to $1,000 for each qualifying child you claim on your return. You may be required to file the new Schedule 8812, Child Tax Credit, with your tax return to claim the credit. See Publication 972, Child Tax Credit, for more information.

4. The Retirement Savings Contributions Credit (Saver’s Credit) helps low-to-moderate income workers save for retirement. You may qualify if your income is below a certain limit and you contribute to an IRA or a retirement plan at work. The credit is in addition to any other tax savings that apply to retirement plans. For more information, see Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs).

5. The American Opportunity Tax Credit helps offset some of the costs that you pay for higher education. The AOTC applies to the first four years of post-secondary education. The maximum credit is $2,500 per eligible student. Forty percent of the credit, up to $1,000, is refundable. You must file Form 8863, Education Credits, to claim it if you qualify. For more information, see Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education.

Make sure you qualify before claiming any tax credit. You can always visit IRS.gov to learn about the rules. The free IRS publications mentioned are also available on IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

QB-Xpert

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